Wednesday, April 10, 2019

2019-04-11 - David and Bathsheba

7 comments:

  1. That's what Peter does too, at the Transfiguration. Let us make three tents. Let me build a house.

    There isn't any record of Bathsheba resisting. I mean, David is the king, and Uriah still argued with him.

    Isaiah today was really cool, 4:4-5.

    Joseph of Arimathea is a really fascinating character, I think.

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    1. Gabby, do you know what Isaiah's referring to in the cloud and the fire in Is. 4:5? It's a reference to something earlier in Scripture. Do you know what it is?

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  2. The Shekinah. The pillar of fire that was God at night and the pillar of cloud that was God by day.

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  3. I thought it interesting that 2 Samuel 11:4 mentions that Bathsheba "was purifying herself from her uncleanness" when David espied her, because she defiled herself minutes later.

    David essentially telling Uriah to slack off (also, the RSVCE notes that "it was a religious law that soldiers should remain continent in time of war") makes me think that he's staying behind in Jerusalem for complacency's sake. For a king not to lead his people into battle would be very odd in the ancient world.

    Mark 15:43 is, I think, the most poetic description of Joseph of Arimathea.

    And yes, Isaiah today was really cool.

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    1. I'm not sure Bathsheba was a willing adulteress, or in a position to say no.

      Good info about soldiers and continence in time of war! David was luring Uriah into a kind of sin, it seems - which Uriah resisted.

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